My JA Search.com

Find what you need and the right place to look

Trelawny

Trelawny is a parish in Cornwall County in northwest Jamaica. Its capital is Falmouth. It is bordered by the parishes of Saint Ann in the east, Saint James in the west, and Saint Elizabeth and Manchester in the south. here to edit text


In 1770, the wealthy planters in St James and St Ann succeeded in having sections of those parishes become the parish of Trelawny as they were too far from administrative centres. Trelawny was named after William Trelawny, the then Governor of Jamaica. The first capital was Martha Brae, located two miles (3 km) inland from Rock Bay.

Trelawny is best known for its sugar estates and sugar cane mills. It had more sugar estates than any other parish, so there was need for a sea coast town to export it. Falmouth became a thriving seaport and social centre. The town had two of its own newspapers; The Falmouth Post and The Falmouth Gazette.

Trelawny was also home to the largest group of Maroons in the island. A 1739 treaty between the Maroons and the English gave the Maroons freedom and land, which effectively put a stop to their raids on the plantations. However, a second Maroon uprising in 1795 led to over 600 Maroons being exiled to Nova Scotia, Canada, and later to Sierra Leone in Africa, in 1800.

In 2007, the opening ceremony for the ICC Cricket World Cup was held in Trelawny Parish.






Premier Attraction:

Luminous Lagoon


The Luminous Lagoon stretches along the marshlands of Trelawny from the small community of Rock to the town of Falmouth. In the 18th century when sugar was king, Falmouth was one of Jamaica's most pivotal ports. Located at the eminent point where the Martha Brae River meets the Caribbean Sea, the lagoon housed a wharf where large vessels from England unloaded goods onto smaller ships to be delivered inland up the river. Once inland, these boats would reload with sugar, rum and other Jamaican exports and carry them back to the harbor. Years after the decline of the sugar trade, scientists discovered the lagoon's geographical location was important for another reason. It was the single best place to observe and study microorganisms called dinoflagellates, which thrive in the layers where salt and fresh water combine and glow the brightest in shallow, warm water.


Being home to millions of dinoflagellates. At night, the lagoon sparkles and glistens when disturbed, as these microscopic organisms produce an eerie glow, reflecting the outlines of fish and other objects in the water. The Luminous Lagoon is said to be the largest and most brilliant of four in the world, a fact that continually attracts and awes visitors and scientists from around the world.








Martha Brae Rafting


Rafting on the Martha Brae, the island’s #1 rafting attraction is located approximately three miles inland from the town of Falmouth, birthplace of one of Jamaica’s former Prime Minister, Hugh Shearer. The attraction is a mere twenty miles from Montego Bay and forty miles from Ocho Rios.

The embarkation area, “Rafter’s Village”, encompasses six acres of beautifully manicured lawns situated on a natural horseshoe island. It offers a fully appointed recreational facility which includes picnic grounds, a full service bar, two souvenir shops, swimming pool and modern restrooms. Before embarking on the tour, guests can also take a stroll through “Miss Martha’s Herb Garden”, a presentation of Jamaica’s herbs famous for their medicinal and healing properties.

Established forty years ago, Rafting on the Martha Brae boasts a complement of eighty five licensed and experienced raft captains. Thirty-foot long bamboo rafts are boarded from a concrete pier, under the supervision of a licensed dispatcher. The raft ride is operated over a three mile stretch of the beautiful Martha Brae river and lasts approximately one hour. Once on the raft, guests can learn about “The Legend of Martha Brae” or enjoy an exhilarating swim.




Chukka at

Good Hope Estate


Good Hope boasts over 2,000 acres of lush plant life, primary jungle and the majestic Martha Brae River. From River Tubing and Zipline Canopy adventures to Estate Tours and the Appleton Rum Tasting Experience, Good Hope offers a variety of tours unlike any other location. 


Good Hope began in 1774 as a sugar estate and grew into a village to support the workers after emancipation. In the 18th century, the Good Hope Estate belonged to John Tharpe, then the largest land and slave owner in Jamaica. Aside from Good Hope, Windsor Estate, the extensive Long Pond Estate and a number of other smaller sugar plantations in Trelawny belonged to Tharpe, who had as many as 3,000 slaves to run the plantations. In addition, Tharpe owned much of the prime waterfront property in Falmouth, and his townhouse, now the Falmouth branch of the government tax office, is still one of the most elegant structures in the town. The small village has some of the best examples of Georgian architecture in the island, and the churchyard has many old and interesting tombstones. At dawn, the Cockpit Country comes alive, and the energetic songs of wild birds float gently on the morning mists.







The River Bumpkin Farm



FALMOUTH, JAMAICA

Escape from reality to a world of rustic charm at The River Bumpkin Farm. Nestled in the heart of the lush Trelawny forests, this gorgeous plantation takes you off-the-beaten-path to a site brimming with exciting eco-excursions.

With everything from river tubing and kayaking down the Martha Brae River to bicycle trekking past historic ruins, The River Bumpkin Farm is the perfect place for the whole family to enjoy








Falmouth Heritage Walks



Whether you arrive by land or by sea, the only way to truly experience the historic town of Falmouth is to explore it on foot.

Falmouth is a historic port town, located between Ocho Rios and Montego Bay on Jamaica's north coast, and is perfectly laid out to be explored by walkers. Founded in 1769, this architectural gem boasts the finest collection of Georgian architecture in the Caribbean, and has been listed asone of the world's 100 most endangered monuments four times in the last decade.